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Wallace Tyner, the James and Lois Ackerman Professor of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University, passed away Aug. 17 after a brief illness. He is survived by his wife, Jean, his sons, Davis and Jeffrey, their wives, and four grandchildren.

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We had about a half inch of rain Sunday and we needed it. The pastures were getting dry and the beans were starting to dry up. That shot of rain really helped. It also helped some of the pastures. Other than that, it's probably time to start getting the combine ready.

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I think we have some pretty decent crops in our area. The rains Saturday night were huge. There was a little wind but nothing major. It was not a good haymaking week, with a couple of little showers and poor drying conditions. I drilled alfalfa and orchard grass Saturday so the rain was huge for that. I think there’s some pretty good yield potential on corn in this area.

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We had some much-needed rain this past week — about 1.6 inches early in the week and a few tenths over the weekend. It was about 2 inches together. The beans look a little better with the rain. Things are progressing.

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We ended up being on the drought monitor this past week, but an inch of rain this past weekend makes me optimistic we will be out of that. Thin parts are starting to show up. I have a 111-day corn planted on April 24 that is starting to dent. We are starting to get knee deep into cover crop stuff and final recommendations put into place. Next week we might start flying cereal rye on.

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We got between 1.5 and 3 inches of rain last week, depending on where you were. I won't complain about that at all. We're getting ready to put some fungicide on the fields, and the late beans look good right now.

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We got almost an inch of rain Saturday night and into Sunday (Aug. 18). That helped. The beans look good and the corn looks good. We've seen some foggy mornings, so I'm feeling good about my decision to put fungicide on the fields.

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We really didn’t do a lot last week. Had some board meetings and went to the State Fair. Crop-wise things progressed and things look good. We got about an inch of rain Saturday night and moderate temperatures today with a possibility of a shot of rain tonight. We couldn’t really ask for a better August so far.

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The start of the week went well with an inch of rain on Monday, which helped greatly. Most of the area was covered, so that made everyone feel better. We started spraying double-crop beans and should be done today if everything goes well. Not much else going on other than mowing of roadways and fungicide spraying. Hope we keep the rain coming to keep this crop moving forward.

We received 1 inch of rain here on the farm this week. There were different amounts around the area though, and where there was little rain, the crop stress is getting more evident. The field work is pretty much done until harvest in our area. Most of the double-crop beans are beginning to bloom; they will have to hurry to beat the frost, I'm afraid. Enjoy what is left of summer!

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Last week brought us 1.7 inches of rain on Monday across White and Hamilton counties, and Tuesday brought 0.7 inches of rain, then Sunday afternoon brought 0.5 to 1 inch. We had a lot of straight-line winds through here on Sunday afternoon, bringing several trees down. The corn seems to be standing well. It looks like the heat is coming to advance GDU on the corn, and beans are growing rapidly. We had an agronomist in our corn Wednesday checking for rust; none was found. How about that market report — all the clowns don’t work for the circus, do they?  I have been on the phone this morning to some terminals. Some basis bids are improving. Looks like this fall marketing the crop is going to take a lot of time and patience for the reality of the real numbers in the market to appear at the farmers’ doorstep. Good luck and have a blessed week.

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There are still a few guys putting on fungicide and insecticide, but that is starting to wind down and we're starting to look toward harvest. We had about an inch of rain, and that was welcome. I've heard from some dairy guys that they are looking at the possibility of starting on silage in a few weeks.

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We got lucky again and caught another nice rain across the area this week. Crops are looking good. These last few rains have really helped our beans. I wish our mid-May beans would have set more pods. As they are wrapping up pod set, they have about 25% less pods than the April beans. Time will tell as beans are very funny and we won’t know yield tell we run with the combine. Big week for markets as we watch the Pro Farmer crop tour and see what they come up with. I have a feeling it will be a market mover. Have a good week.

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This week we got about 2 inches of rain in some areas, although rain was not widespread in Central Illinois. We have been scouting fields and have seen very little disease pressure in crops. We have noticed some corn tipping back and beans are in R5 stage now. Looking ahead, more rain in the forecast and cooler temperatures coming which means adding test weight to the corn and help filling out bean pods. As always, be safe.

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A few spotty showers managed to find their way to our area, but the soaking rains that we have needed continue to squeak around us. While the temps haven't been miserably warm, we struggle for moisture on every farm. To top it off, the USDA report seemed to be a sucker punch. As dry and frustrating as this growing season has been, I do think we will learn a lot this harvest regarding what works and what doesn’t work. While we originally thought that we would have a late start to harvest, it’s not as far away, which means harvest equipment maintenance is on our agenda this week.

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Another week of summer temperatures in the 90s moved the crop along, trying to make up some of the season delay. Fungicide applications to soybeans are continuing. Yield checks on corn and soybeans seem premature with beans still setting pods and the potential for tip-back on corn still a concern. Storms brought heavy winds and rain, and some corn and soybeans leaned as a result. Weekly rainfall totals in a few isolated parts of the neighborhood were over 12 inches! The limited acres of sorghum in the area have already headed. It’s time to begin servicing equipment and preparing for harvest along with a quick trip to the Farm Progress Show to see the industry’s showcase.

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Crops are hanging in there but are still in need of moisture. We have had a few scattered showers but only a quarter inch here and there. The disease pressure is fairly low on both corn and soybeans currently. In the corn hybrids that are more susceptible to gray leaf spot, it’s showing up, especially if they were not sprayed with a fungicide. In the no-till/strip-till corn-on-corn environments, anthracnose can be found. We will need to monitor the growth of the disease pressure, which might move the harvest date up a little bit.

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We were blessed with 1.9 inches of rain last week — 1.7 of that came yesterday while in church. (I must have put enough in the collection.) The corn was starting to abort kernels before the rain, so this will slow that down and speed up kernel development. June-planted beans will grow now and hopefully set pods. With only 10 days left in August we are running out of time. I sure hope we stay warm through September. Waterhemp is showing up in some fields, and this rain will bring that problem on even more. There is quite a bit of corn borer in conventional corn. The traited corn is clean. We have a chance of rain tomorrow again up this way, we definitely could use more to keep crop progress going as fast as possible. 

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Marking the World Humanitarian Day’s 10th anniversary Aug. 19, the United Nations honored the contribution of tens of thousands of women aid workers who provide life-saving support to vulnerable people caught in crises in some of the world’s most dangerous places.

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Minnesota Governor Tim Walz will participate in the 2019 “Purple Ribbon 4-H Livestock Auction” at the Minnesota State Fair, which will mark the 40th anniversary of the auction. The Purple Ribbon 4-H Auction will be held on Saturday, Aug. 24, at 5:45 p.m., in Compeer Arena at the State Fairgrounds.

November beans have closed lower in three of the last four sessions, but traders will be watching crop condition and progress numbers closely, according to The Hightower Report.

Strong profit margins for packers appear to be pushing the cattle market while the pork market is more sluggish, according to The Hightower Report.

Corn and soybeans were firmer in light trading overnight thanks to lower-than-expected crop ratings on Monday from the USDA and early thoughts from the Pro Farmer tour, according to Allendale.

The weekly USDA Crop Progress report Monday afternoon pegged corn at 56% good or excellent, down 1% from the previous week, according to CHS Hedging.

Pig breeders in China who have managed to keep African swine fever off their farms are now looking at record profits, according to Allendale.

Wheat futures are steady to 2 cents per bushel higher across the three U.S. markets early Tuesday, according to Brugler Marketing and Management.

The cattle market opened the week steady on strong packer margins, according to Brugler Marketing and Management.

Agricultural research, whether it’s conducted in the United States or abroad, has forever transformed the landscape of farming. From the hybridization of plant species and the production of biofuels to the utilization of precision-agricultural technologies, when countries invest in agricultural research the world benefits. Providing economic-development programs to developing countries reduces poverty rates and increases purchasing power, which expands market opportunities for U.S. farmers.

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There will be several baking contests hosted at this year’s Sheboygan County Fair. Don’t miss the daily entertainment! Look daily for Granpa Cratchet, the Wisconsin Dockdogs, and Pleasure Valley Pig and Duck Races. The fair will be held from Aug. 29 to Sept. 2 at the Sheboygan County Fair Association, 229 Fairview Drive, Plymouth, Wisconsin. Visit www.shebcofair.com for more information. Visit bit.ly/countyfairs2019 for more information on all Wisconsin fairs.

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It was a down day for grains as traders see a decent amount of rain in the upcoming forecasts, Ami L. Heesch of CHS Hedging said. “First blush crop reports, from the annual corn/soybean tour this week, suggest the corn and bean crops are lagging in development,” she said.

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Profit-taking was to blame for much of corn’s turn in the red today, Ami L. Heesch of CHS Hedging said. “Prices drew additional pressure from lack of fresh supportive news, slowing demand as evidenced in this morning’s inspection figure,” she said.

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In weighted average negotiated prices for barrows and gilts, USDA reported;

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Wheat’s market traded “in sympathy with the row crops,” Ami L. Heesch of CHS Hedging said. Harvest is expected to begin this week, after rains delayed movement last week. Export inspections were reported in line with expectations.

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“The hog market has been about as bi-polar as it possibly can get,” Oliver Sloup of Blue Line Futures said, adding that swings can be overblown. In the near-term, he said he thinks today’s movement in the lean hog market is more indicative of a relief rally.

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A drop in currency has slowed down Argentina farmers’ selling of soybeans, Steve Freed of ADM Investor Services said. Meanwhile, traders are starting to accept the USDA acreage and yield numbers, ahead of the crop tour results this week.

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Boxed beef cutout values this afternoon were firm to higher on moderate demand and light offerings, USDA said.

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The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection recently confirmed that a horse and a mule on the same premises in Taylor County, Wisconsin, have tested positive for equine infectious anemia. Those are Wisconsin’s first confirmed cases of equine infectious anemia in almost 15 years. There's no treatment for equine infectious anemia. To prevent transmitting it, infected animals are humanely euthanized.

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Due to several Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) outbreaks in Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Nebraska all susceptible livestock (beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, hogs, llamas, and alpacas) including horses coming to the Nebraska State Fair from Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Nebraska need a 48 hour Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) to enter the fairgrounds. That CVI must also contain the federal VS statement: "The animals represented on the CVI have not originated from premises or area under quarantine for Vesicular Stomatitis or a premises on which Vesicular Stomatitis has been diagnosed in the last (30) days. I have examined the animals and found no signs of Vesicular Stomatitis." Animals will be observed once on the grounds. All horses will be examined daily by a veterinarian.

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According to Allendale, China’s top soybean buyer said they “can do without soybean supplies from the U.S. in the fourth quarter,” relying solely on South American imports.

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“Not much news,” CHS Hedging’s Steve Hyde said. “Hopefully weather will cooperate with producers this week to allow for better spring wheat harvest. World stocks continue to grow, demand is slack, but U. S. should be in better shape to compete for business given price levels at this time.”

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The slaughter number coming in higher last week may assuage fears that there will be an oversupply of cattle, The Hightower Report said. A surge in beef prices has also boosted packer margins, which may have helped the slaughter on Saturday.

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Despite weak technical action and lower pork prices, downside in the market may be limited if exports pick up steam, The Hightower Report said.

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Coming into this week, “there is no technical sign of a low” in cattle, The Hightower report said. “If there is a sense that the industry can deal with the plant fire issue without building a massive supply of market-ready cattle, cattle futures look undervalued.”

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“Timely weekend rains over dry areas are pressuring prices overnight and early this morning,” Steve Hyde of CHS Hedging said. The rains are expected to improve crop conditions across the Midwest, as farmers turn their attention to a possibly late harvest.

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Large supply numbers and favorable weather helped drag down overnight markets entering Monday, Allendale said. “Traders will be paying attention to various crop tours and survey's beginning this week searching for clearer answers on what we can expect in the fields this yea,” Allendale said.

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Agri-View offers a schedule of events of special interest to our readers. Some events and activities might require advance registration. Email agriview@madison.com with calendar submissions.

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Developing alternatives to antibiotics is the aim of scientists at Canada's University of British Columbia. New antimicrobial peptides effective against a wide range of bacteria already have been found by Inanc Birol. He's a professor at the University of British Columbia’s Department of Medical Genetics. But he also recently showed a computational approach designed to be faster and more effective at isolating new antimicrobial peptides.

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