NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is predicting a 60 percent chance that the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be above-normal. There is a 30 percent chance of a near-normal season and just a 10 percent chance of a below-normal season.

We can expect a likely range of 13-19 named storms, of which 6-10 are expected to become hurricanes. Of those hurricanes, 3-6 are expected to become major hurricanes of Category 3 or higher.

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FULL TRANSCRIPT:

On May 21st, NOAA issued its 2020 seasonal hurricane outlook for the Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins.

For the Atlantic, a busy hurricane season is predicted.

Here at NOAA, we're predicting a 60 percent chance that the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be above-normal. There is a 30 percent chance of the season being near-normal and only a ten percent chance of it being below-normal.

Overall, this year's outlook reflects several climate factors that are conducive to increased hurricane activity, including the ongoing high-activity era that has been in place since 1995.

We are predicting ENSO neutral or La Niña conditions, along with warmer-than-average sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, coupled with reduced vertical wind shear, weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds, and an enhanced west African monsoon.

Hurricane preparedness is critically important for the 2020 hurricane season, just as it is every year. Keep in mind, you may need to adjust any preparedness actions based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and your local officials.

As we know, it takes just one storm to cause significant damage from high winds, storm surge, and flooding as tropical systems move inland after striking coastal communities.

NOAA works closely with our partners to help emergency managers and communities make targeted decisions to support public safety.

More than 80 million people in the U.S. live in areas that could be impacted by a hurricane, and only a fraction of those live along the immediate coast. Now is the time to get prepared.

Visit the National Hurricane Center’s website at hurricanes.gov throughout the season to stay on top of any watches and warnings. Be sure to visit FEMA’s website, ready.gov, for additional hurricane preparedness tips.

Hurricane preparation starts at home. Start today, and have a safe hurricane season.

Together we can build a more Weather-Ready Nation.

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